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NMSU TEXTILE SALE

Annual textile sale to benefit Maya youth

Posted

The eighth annual Textile Sale to Benefit Maya Youth will be 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 28-29, in the lobby of the NMSU Museum, in Kent Hall on the NMSU campus, 1280 E. University Ave. in Las cruces.

This year’s sale features wearable donations, including huipils (blouses), men’s shirts, jackets, shawls, ponchos, scarves, hats and all kinds of shoulder- and handbags, said event coordinator Christine Eber.

“Sixty donors have made the fundraiser possible by sending textiles and other items from Latin America that they have collected over the years and want to pass on for a good cause,” Eber said.

The event will include a presentation by guest speaker Carol Hendrickson, Ph.D., anthropology professor emerita at Marlboro College in Marlboro, Vermont, who will talk about the work she has been doing in Guatemala since the 1970s. Hendrickson was one of the founding donors to Weaving for Justice’s textile project and former president of the board of The Maya Educational Foundation (MEF).

“Weaving for Justice welcomes donations at any time to sell at our store on the third Saturday of the month and on the Weaving for Justice Instagram account,” she said.

“If people would like to see additional donations (during the textile sale), such as table coverings, clay figures and books, a volunteer will be on hand to take them to our store at First Christian Church, 1809 El Paseo Road, just five minutes from the University Museum,” Eber said.

Proceeds from the sale go to scholarships for Maya youth, she said. Through a partnership with MEF, Weaving for Justice is a volunteer, nonprofit “working in solidarity with Maya women’s weaving cooperatives in highland Chiapas, Mexico,” according to the Weaving for Justice website. MEF was founded in 1992 “to help the Maya people who had suffered so much in the 36-year-long violent civil war in Guatemala that peaked in the 1980s,” according to the MEF website.

“Each year, more and more children and youth in Belize, Chiapas and Guatemala are pursuing their dreams of an education thanks to our textile donors and MEF,” Eber said.

Last year’s Weaving for Justice textile sale included 53 donors and raised $10,000, she said.

Donors can email weavingforjustice@gmail.com for more information. Contact Eber at ceber@nmsu.edu. Visit weaving-for-justice.org/ and www.mayaedufound.org for more information.

Textile Sale